The Nevesphere
stanceded:

roxie911:

Gpoy

Uh huh

stanceded:

roxie911:

Gpoy

Uh huh

lonelyistheonlycompany:

abcdeejae:

jayy-thegreat:

persecutedmaiden:

puredestruction:

fr4grance:

lisatotherescue-:

thatkarmakid:

boyfriday:

octopusheart:

theoriginalspike:

justagirlthatsmiles:

roguechaotic:

I’m totally doing this to my future girlfriend when she’s trying to be professional.

Perfection. LOL

I’m fucking crying omg

i’m jacob

He’s brilliant. I want to marry

Wouldn’t mind him as a husband.

omg

I LOLed pretty hard at this

LMAO

holy omfg. i just pissed myself!

hahahaha omg! can i marry him

Lmaooo

get outta my house!? did my house!

Omg lmfaoo 

Lol. this is literally me and my lady.

fastcompany:

Last month, I talked to Amazon customer service about my malfunctioning Kindle, and it was great. Thirty seconds after putting in a service request on Amazon’s website, my phone rang, and the woman on the other end—let’s call her Barbara—greeted me by name and said, “I understand that you have a problem with your Kindle.” We resolved my problem in under two minutes, we got to skip the part where I carefully spell out my last name and address, and she didn’t try to upsell me on anything. After nearly a decade of ordering stuff from Amazon, I never loved the company as much as I did at that moment.
Remember, this was a customer-service call, so I was fully prepared for it to suck. Like most American consumers, my experience with service interactions is largely negative, whether it’s on the phone, in the murky depths of a commerce site, or in the aisles of an electronics store. I’m accustomed to the company being in control, and for our communication to be cold, scripted, and inhumane. Barbara’s congenial but no-nonsense approach was part of what made this experience different, but more important, she had access to exactly the right data about me, and that made the favorable exchange possible. The fact is, Amazon has been collecting my information for years—not just addresses and payment information but the identity of everything I’ve ever bought or even looked at. And while dozens of other companies do that, too, Amazon’s doing something remarkable with theirs. They’re using that data to build our relationship.
Read more about How Companies Like Amazon Use Big Data To Make You Love Them

fastcompany:

Last month, I talked to Amazon customer service about my malfunctioning Kindle, and it was great. Thirty seconds after putting in a service request on Amazon’s website, my phone rang, and the woman on the other end—let’s call her Barbara—greeted me by name and said, “I understand that you have a problem with your Kindle.” We resolved my problem in under two minutes, we got to skip the part where I carefully spell out my last name and address, and she didn’t try to upsell me on anything. After nearly a decade of ordering stuff from Amazon, I never loved the company as much as I did at that moment.

Remember, this was a customer-service call, so I was fully prepared for it to suck. Like most American consumers, my experience with service interactions is largely negative, whether it’s on the phone, in the murky depths of a commerce site, or in the aisles of an electronics store. I’m accustomed to the company being in control, and for our communication to be cold, scripted, and inhumane. Barbara’s congenial but no-nonsense approach was part of what made this experience different, but more important, she had access to exactly the right data about me, and that made the favorable exchange possible. The fact is, Amazon has been collecting my information for years—not just addresses and payment information but the identity of everything I’ve ever bought or even looked at. And while dozens of other companies do that, too, Amazon’s doing something remarkable with theirs. They’re using that data to build our relationship.

Read more about How Companies Like Amazon Use Big Data To Make You Love Them

Stupid people

Apparently I can’t escape them in my life. Despite being on the verge of graduation with my B.B.A, I encounter people with extreme lack in writing skill, accountability, and just the ability to be a halfway decent human being academically.

As a tame example, one member submitted the executive summary entry for one section out of 7 in part 1 of a project. An executive summary is usually limited to one page and is meant to explain the vital information of the report if your boss/audience has only a minute to understand the report, and his submission was about half a page in length. On top of that, it was littered with “very”, “extremely”, and other adjectives that a senior should know NOT TO FUCKING USE IN A PROPER PAPER. Fuck your unneeded adjectives, nigga!

ONLY ONE MORE WEEK BITCHES!

Don’t give anyone a reason to expect the worse in you; challenge that belief with more effort than you ever thought you could muster. Once you realize that you are in control of your life, it will change forever.
As far as I know, myself :D
This is for you Mandi

This is for you Mandi